Monday, May 21st

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One of the most influential photos of all time is this color picture, called Earthrise, snapped by Apollo 8 astronaut Bill Anders on Christmas Eve 1968.(Photo: NASA)

At the end of one of the most divisive years in America's short history, a year when thousands of Americans died in Vietnam, two great leaders were gunned down and rioters filled the streets outside the Democratic National Convention, three men calmly read a Bible passage to one-third of the planet.

Taking turns reading from the Book of Genesis, the astronauts' words spoken live from space seemed to calm, at least momentarily, a restive Earth.

Overshadowed by the Apollo 11 moon landing and Apollo 13's near calamity, Apollo 8 is best known for the stunning "Earthrise" photo shot from the space capsule's window and the Christmas Eve broadcast half a century ago.

But the Apollo 8 crew — Milwaukee native James Lovell, Frank Borman and William Anders — were the first humans to travel to Earth's most ancient companion, the moon.

Police squad car(Photo: File/USA TODAY NETWORK/Wisconsin)

A Good Samaritan died after stopping to help a motorist who struck several guardrails on Highway 51 in Dane County.

A 25-year-old Monona man came upon the one-vehicle accident shortly before 9 p.m. Saturday and while trying to help the driver fell over the Highway 51 overpass and on to Bear Tree Parkway below, DeForest police said.

The Monona man, whose name was not released, was taken to a hospital, where he died a few hours later.

A 61-year-old Sun Prairie man was traveling south on Highway 51 when his vehicle struck numerous guardrails before coming to a stop in a traffic lane. He was taken to a hospital for non-life-threatening injuries.

He was arrested for drunken driving. Authorities said alcohol and speed were likely contributing factors in the crash.

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Police squad car(Photo: File/USA TODAY NETWORK/Wisconsin)

A Good Samaritan died after stopping to help a motorist who struck several guardrails on Highway 51 in Dane County.

A 25-year-old Monona man came upon the one-vehicle accident shortly before 9 p.m. Saturday and while trying to help the driver, fell over the Highway 51 overpass and on to Bear Tree Parkway below, DeForest police said.

The Monona man, whose name was not released, was taken to a hospital, where he died a few hours later.

A 61-year-old Sun Prairie man was traveling south on Highway 51 when his vehicle struck numerous guardrails before coming to a stop in a traffic lane. He was taken to a hospital for non-life-threatening injuries.

He was arrested for drunken driving. Authorities said alcohol and speed were likely contributing factors in the crash.

 

 

Kaitlyn Riley was named the 71st Alice in Dairyland on Saturday.(Photo: Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection)

Kaitlyn Riley, 24, of Gays Mills was named  the 2018 Alice in Dairyland at the Adams-Friendship Fine Arts Center in Adams on Saturday night.

Riley, who grew up on a Jersey dairy farm, was named this year's Alice over five other finalists.

She will work as a communications professional for the state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection and will focus on the importance of agriculture to the state's economy. 

It is estimated Riley will travel 40,000 miles over the next year for speaking events, media interviews and meetings with students in more than 100 classrooms. 

Riley is a 2017 journalism graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

After college graduation, Riley, who was an Alice finalist last year in Green Bay, worked as a reporter for a television station in   Eau Claire. 

Riiley is Wisconsin's 71st Alice in Dairyland.

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Attorney John A. Birdsall in his law office on Old World Third St. in Milwaukee.(Photo: Michael Sears / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

After years of mounting evidence that Wisconsin's lawyers are turning down requests to represent poor defendants because of the state's lowest-in-the-nation $40 hourly pay, the Supreme Court has decided to raise the rate, in some cases, to $100.

The change is meant to address a constitutional crisis, advocates say, not make lawyers rich, since even the new rate is well under what most lawyers charge clients who can afford to hire their own attorney.

John Birdsall, a Milwaukee lawyer who co-authored a petition to the high court last year seeking the change, and who argued the need at a hearing Wednesday before the court, said he was informed of the court's decision later that day. He called it a welcome step in the right direction.

"However, the lack of lawyers to handle the vast majority of the 58,000 cases that are farmed out from the SPD to private lawyers will soon overwhelm an already highly stressed system in the coming year or two," he said.